Archive for the ‘Internet Resources’ category

Service to Homeschooling Families: LA and Santa Maria Pre-Workshop Assignment Part 2

March 2, 2009

Another resource I think is valuable to those who want to learn more about homeschooling (which I’ve linked to here before and that I’ll be citing several times in the workshops next week) is the National Center for Education Statistics’ report, “Homeschooling in the United States: 2003.” The stats are a bit dated at this point, but they are also the most rigorously collected and carefully analyzed stats currently available on homeschooling. It is tremendously difficult to find studies of homeschooling that focus, like this one does, on homeschoolers as a whole rather than a very select group of homeschoolers. The authors’ comments in the NCES report speak to some of the difficulties in collecting information about homeschoolers, and some of their findings might surprise you. Here are just a few interesting factoids from the study:

  • * The number one reason homeschooling parents (85.4% of respondents) gave for homeschooling their children was “concern about environment of other schools.” The number two reason (68.2% of respondents) was “dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools.”
  • * Homeschooled children are more likely to come from two-parent families, have more siblings, and have one parent home full-time than their institutionally-schooled peers.
  • * 77.9% of respondents reported using the public library as a primary source of learning materials. The library won out over homeschooling catalogs, bookstores, and homeschooling organizations–as well it should.

The NCES has started updating this data, and in December they published a new “In Brief” report, “1.5 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2007.” It’s nothing earth-shattering, but it’s worth a quick read.

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Service to Homeschooling Families: LA and Santa Maria Pre-Workshop Assignment Part 1

February 19, 2009

Welcome attendees of Infopeople’s upcoming “Service to Homeschooling Families” workshops in LA (March 9th) and Santa Maria (March 11th)! California has a vibrant homeschooling community. I’ve loved having the opportunity to learn more about it talking to library staff in past workshops, and I’m looking forward to learning more in the ones to come! In preparation for the workshop, I thought some of you might like to get a head start on exploring the world of homeschooling. One of my favorite websites for newbies is the Homeschool Diner, maintained by homeschooler Julie Shepherd Knapp. Her “Guide to Homeschooling Approaches and Curriculum (and Everything)” is designed for new homeschoolers, but it’s also an excellent resource for library staff who would like to begin learning more about homeschooling. I highly recommend reading the article and delving further into the site. If you would like to post a comment here to let me know what you think about what you’re reading, I’d be glad to hear from you.

January 17, 2009

Check out my article, “Diversify Your Homeschool Plan with Vanishing Cultures” and the rest of the articles in Lee & Low’s new section on their website for homeschoolers.

Service to Homeschooling Families: Solano County Pre-Workshop Assignment, Part 3

January 10, 2009

Here are some links to information I found about homeschooling support groups in Solano County:

* A to Z Home’s Cool listing of groups
* Crossroads Homeschool Group
* Christian Homeschoolers of Solano County

Service to Homeschooling Families: Infopeople Pre-Workshop Assignment, Part 2

January 7, 2009

Another resource I think is valuable to those who want to learn more about homeschooling (which I’ve linked to here before and that I’ll be citing several times in the workshop next week) is the National Center for Education Statistics’ report, “Homeschooling in the United States: 2003.” The stats are a bit dated at this point, but they are also the most rigorously collected and carefully analyzed stats currently available on homeschooling. It is tremendously difficult to find studies of homeschooling that focus, like this one does, on homeschoolers as a whole rather than a very select group of homeschoolers. The authors’ comments in the NCES report speak to some of the difficulties in collecting information about homeschoolers, and some of their findings might surprise you. Here are just a few interesting factoids from the study:

The number one reason homeschooling parents (85.4% of respondents) gave for homeschooling their children was “concern about environment of other schools.” The number two reason (68.2% of respondents) was “dissatisfaction with academic instruction at other schools.”

  • * Homeschooled children are more likely to come from two-parent families, have more siblings, and have one parent home full-time than their institutionally-schooled peers.
  • * 77.9% of respondents reported using the public library as a primary source of learning materials. The library won out over homeschooling catalogs, bookstores, and homeschooling organizations–as well it should.
  • The NCES has started updating this data, and just this past month they published a new “In Brief” report, “1.5 Million Homeschooled Students in the United States in 2007.” It’s nothing earth-shattering, but it’s work a quick read.

    [Note: If you’re just joining us, please don’t miss our first preworkshop assignment.]

    Service to Homeschooling Families: Infopeople Pre-Workshop Assignments, Part 1

    January 2, 2009

    Welcome attendees of Infopeople’s upcoming “Service to Homeschooling Families” workshops at the Solano County Library – Fairfield (January 12th), Buena Park Library District (January 14th) and San Diego County Library Headquarters (January 15th). I am very much looking forward to meeting all of you the week after next. In preparation for the workshop, I thought some of you might like to get a head start on exploring the world of homeschooling. One of my favorite websites for newbies is the Homeschool Diner, maintained by homeschooler Julie Shepherd Knapp. Her “Guide to Homeschooling Approaches and Curriculum (and Everything)” is designed for the new homeschooler, but it’s also an excellent resource for library staff who would like to begin learning more about homeschoolers. I highly recommend reading the article and delving further into the site. If you would like to post a comment here to let me know what you think about what you’re reading, I’d be glad to hear from you.

    Service to Homeschooling Families, San Franciso: Pre-Workshop Assignment #3

    December 1, 2008

    One of the most important things I encourage library staff to do when they’re beginning to build services to homeschoolers is to become familiar with local homeschooling groups. With an eye to that, I did some Google searching in an attempt to uncover some homeschooling resources in the San Francisco area:

    San Francisco Homeschoolers

    This inclusive group (open to anyone) organizes members-only activities, maintains a website, and also maintains a Yahoo Group. Membership costs $9/year.

    San Francisco Bay Unschooling Network (SFBUN)

    This active Yahoo Group is a support system for unschoolers in the Bay Area.

    California Homeschool Network’s Listing of Support Groups in San Francisco

    This listing includes contact information for several groups that don’t appear to maintain websites.

    [Don’t forget pre-workshop assignments parts 1 and 2. See you all Thursday!]